Preventing Process Failure with FMEA (Failure Modes & Effects Analysis)

FMEA (Failure Modes & Effects Analysis) is a Lean Six Sigma technique for identifying both the ways that a product, part, process or service can fail and the effects of those failures.Once these failure modes are identified, they are rated by the severity of their effects and failure probability. This is critical to the design of any system, process, service or product.

FMEA-Round-1
Sample FMEA GRID

There are 3 types of FMEA’s; system, process and design. However in this post I will only touch upon the Process FMEA. Process FMEA’s identify the different ways that a process could fail and the effects of those failures. They are often used to identify and rank process improvement opportunities. For the lower risk failure modes preventative plans are put in place to ensure minimal impact to productivity, costs, and delivery.

For example, say a Health Tech Startup, creates an app for patient on-boarding with a plethora of functionalities that they consider to be in the “cool factor”. However, this overload of features could overwhelm the user and miss the value curve completely.  With an FMEA analysis they would be able to identify the most critical features, risks, and problems with the product before they take it to market, in turn, significantly reducing rework, product, and process costs.

Contact us now to learn more about how to minimize rework costs and identify problems in processes, systems or products before they are used or put into production.

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