E.O.W (End of the Week) Notable Tip: Unprofitable Factors in the industry

Happy Friday!

I hope you’ve had a great week.

Today, I want to discuss unprofitable activities/factors that your company may be utilizing a great deal of resources on.

“By understanding your customer’s priorities you are able to shift resources to activities that drive value and profitability, in turn, eliminating those factors that yield no profits and realizing opportunities to create new factors that have not been offered before. It is critical that your accounting team is aware of the activities and customers that offer the most profit by creating and maintaining a Customer P&L sheet. “

 

As always, “Success is continuous improvement!”

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Lean Wednesday Tip: Product Development Costs

“During the design and planning phase of your product is the best time to identify and deal with problems. Being able to understand the many ways your product can fail before costly investments are made in equipment or customer will keep costs down and client satisfaction high.”

Notable Bookkeeping: SQL Work Portfolio Showcase

Happy Friday!

I hope you’ve had a great week!

Notable Bookkeeping can code! We are proficient in SQL, Python and HTML. See our work samples here.

We’re also proficient in Excel including data manipulation methods, such as,  vlookup, formulas, pivot tables, graphs and conditional formatting.

How are we different? We align customer priorities with strategic goals to reduce data costs and glean valuable profitable insights.

Contact us now!

E.O.W (End of the Week) Notable Tip: Numbers Vs People

Happy Friday!

I hope you’ve had a great week! Read below for the EOW for today, Friday, October 6, 2017.

“When it comes to safeguarding the bottom-line, hitting the numbers is the only focus. This narrow thought process causes leaders to lose sight of what truly drives those numbers and that is their employees and customers. When employees and client satisfaction is made top priority revenue/profit  follows.”

 

I hope you’ve enjoyed this tip!

As always, “Success is continuous improvement.”

Maintaining Integrity during rapid growth

What is integrity? According to dictionary.com, integrity is “adherence to moral and ethical principles; soundness of moral character; honesty.” Why is it important in business? Integrity in business is important because it builds internal and external trust amongst all the people that have dealings with the company.

Effective leaders “walk the talk”; in other words they do what they say. It is imperative that during the early stages of a startup that codes of conduct be established that convey how business will be done and how employees, clients and suppliers will be treated. Companies that have great cultures are avid believers of collaboration. They encourage employees to share ideas and work together to solve problems.

“Two heads are better than one but 7 heads are even better”

When your company is impacted by rapid growth it is often found that you lose touch with your employees, reaching targets takes priority instead of optimizing client satisfaction, and company values may become diluted as employees may start to do anything necessary to keep their jobs. Effective leaders implement department headcount caps of 170 or less, discuss company values, mission and strategy daily, and have employee-centric cultures.

For example, an automotive air bag manufacturer, Takata, wanted to cut costs so they opted for a cheaper material which resulted in a mass recall. Evidently, they increased their losses by not maintaining integrity in their product. There are many other ways to cut cost but keep quality and this showed their lack of consideration for their customers. They were more concerned about their bottom line. It is going to take a long time for them to build trust with those customers that they lost because of their poor judgment and poor ethics.

Nevertheless, it is important that leaders ensure that their employees understand and never stray from the company’s core values by discussing this matter daily. Customer satisfaction, internal and external respect amongst employees, clients and suppliers, and collaboration are the key factors that make for an enduring company. When employees trust their coworkers and leaders they work together as a team and protect the company from harm.

E.O.W(End of the Week) Notable Tip: Alternatives to Layoffs during business financial hardships

Happy Friday!

I hope you’ve had a great week.

Today, I would like to discuss some alternatives to reducing costs during business financial hardships instead of mass layoffs. Strong and effective leaders build trust in their companies and see their employees as their second family sometimes even as an extension of their family. When employees become aware of financial troubles in the company their stress levels go higher than usual, their health may become impaired, and productivity is also affected. Laying off a plethora of people causes employees to lose trust and loyalty to a company. When employees trust their leaders they are less likely to move on to greener pastures because security, trust, and opportunity is integrated into the culture offering a peace of mind.

“When faced with financial troubles in your business try to see ways to cut costs, require/offer unpaid vacations to employees (4-8 weeks), and integrate an evergreen employment policy that stipulates employees will not lose their jobs if the company is facing financial troubles (hire the right people through rigorous hiring practices to ensure they are worth keeping). “

Through an expenses analysis you can identify expenses that your company can live without and requiring employees to take 4-8 weeks of unpaid vacations during hard times can also free up cash as well. However, the unpaid vacation should not be forced and only those employees that can afford to take time off should take advantage of this. You can also offer employees the opportunity to work from home as this will reduce your electricity bill.

I hope you’ve enjoyed this E.O.W!

As always, “Success is continuous improvement.”

 

 

Lean Wednesday Tip: Inventory Management

“An effective inventory management process includes the sharing of inventory data between buyers and suppliers. Procurement Managers use the total cost method when purchasing and inventory analysts anticipate and understand demand trends (collaborate with Marketing to understand customer purchasing behavior and trends) and share this information with suppliers.”

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