Lean Wednesday Tip: Quality Costs

“Internal departments in a firm that are far-removed from daily operations can affect the quality of a product or service. Every department within a company should identify, collect and monitor quality costs within its control.”

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E.O.W(End of the Week) Notable Tip: Insurance

Happy Friday!

I hope you’ve had a great week.

Today I leave you with a short tip on how CFO’s can save money on business insurance.

“CFO’s can get better insurance deals by becoming involved and sharing with insurers balance sheet information, profit and loss, cash flow statements, credit ratings and cash reserves. In short, a business that has strong financial health is able to retain more risk.”

As always remember, “Success is continuous improvement.”

Strategic Customer Analysis

It is common practice to determine your target customer when developing a business. However, this tunnel vision buyer group mentality leaves money on the table for businesses. To truly optimize profit and revenue a company’s leadership must be well aware of the many buyer groups (purchasers, actual users, and influencers) that can offer opportunity to enter into a new market space with high profit potential.

For example, say you are leather shoe manufacturer who usually focuses on retailers as its main buyer group. Through analysis of your current, similar and alternative products coupled with identifying the pain points of using your product you can realize a low-cost profitable opportunity to reel in your end users; essentially entering into a new market space.

A more effective strategic customer analysis would require you to understand the following:

  • Why buyers choose to buy your product; aka purchase criteria
  • What are the factors that cause customers to become angry with your product or company
  • What are the factors that keep potential customers at bay (you must understand their priorities and create solutions to meet their needs)
  • The preferences of your customers
  • The decision making process of your customers
  • Customer behavior
  • Why they choose to buy at a certain time (holidays, birthday, graduation, et cetera)
  • Time, travel, hassle and money the customer is willing to pay for buying and using your product or service
  • What functional needs need to be met
  • purchasing power

Businesses must also understand what factors motivate buyers to purchase based on price or quality. However, it is imperative that you just focus on the buyer group that has the highest profit potential at a lower cost and your company’s capabilities are able to meet their priorities.

Lean Wednesday Tip: Variation in a process

“Sources of variation can be found in the process itself, the raw materials used, the operator’s (employee’s) actions or the environment. For example, software settings / updates, tool wear, humidity, heat, and over-adjusting a machine are all sources of variation.”

E.O.W (End of the Week) Notable Tip: Redesigning Business Models

Happy Friday!

I hope you’ve had a great week.

Today, I want to discuss business models. As we all know, changes in trends and customer behavior affects profit. Therefore, it is important that leaders stay abreast of trends that could affect their bottom-line and have solutions at the ready. They should also include non-customers into their value chain spectrum for the purpose of realizing profitable opportunities.

“Companies should redesign their business model every 4 to 5 years.”

 

I hope you’ve enjoyed this short tip and as always, “Success is continuous improvement.”

E.O.W (End of the Week) Notable Tip: Strategic Plan Performance

Happy Friday!

I hope you’ve had a great week.

Today, I want to end this week with key insights on strategic plan performance.

“Strategic plans should concentrate on critical success factors for the company, providing plans for closing the gaps between what the company is capable of doing versus what it needs to be able to do. Gap analysis is key to identifying areas for improving performance. Negative gaps require immediate corrective action to eliminate the root cause and improve performance toward the goal and narrow the gap. Positive gaps showing better than expected performance may encourage the company to take further action to enhance the gap. Lastly, it is critical to integrate a contingency plan in case of errors or significant changes in the market occur.”

 

As always, “Success is continuous improvement.”

 

Reasons for Lean Six Sigma

Lean Six Sigma allows for the improvement in speed and performance of a process coupled with the reduction of waste and defects. If you ever find your current processes with high rework, client turnover, product recalls/crashes, and a plethora of errors it might be time to change your process design. As you will read below, I have noted a few benefits and reasons for Lean Six Sigma.

  • Lean Six Sigma projects cut costs and expenses by eliminating waste (a result of inefficient or non-value added process steps).
  • Whilst, the reduction of expenses helps companies yield higher revenues and profits. Improvements in quality and delivery also have the potential to increase sales and profit.
  • When waste is eliminated, processes flow seamlessly and delivery times improve.
  • As a process flows more quickly, the amount of inventory needed to keep the process moving is reduced and cash is freed up for investment elsewhere.
  • By improving quality in each process, customer satisfaction is increased.
  • Lean Six Sigma allows employees to work in valued added processes which in turn increases overall internal satisfaction and morale.
  • The cost savings of implementing Lean Six Sigma, compared to the time and resources spent working on a project without Lean Six Sigma is typically 10 to 20 times the investment.

 

Notable Bookkeeping is a certified Lean Six Sigma company. Contact us today to learn more about our process improvement/Lean Sig Sigma services! We work with all industries and all company sizes.

 

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